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Kubernetes, Four Years Later, and Amazon Redefining Container Orchestration

1 week 5 days ago
by Petros Koutoupis

Well, here we are. Kubernetes turns four years old this month—technically, on June 7, 2018—the very same platform that brings users and data center administrators scalable container technologies. Its popularity has skyrocketed since its initial introduction by Google. Celebrating the project’s birthday is not the only thing making the headlines today. Amazon recently announced the general availability of its Elastic Container Services for Kubernetes (EKS), accessible via Amazon Web Services (AWS).

Once upon a time, it wasn’t a simple task to orchestrate and manage containers in the cloud. Up until this recent EKS announcement, it was up to the administrator to spin up a virtual machine through an Elastic Cloud Compute (EC2) service, run Kubernetes on top of a traditional Linux server installation in EC2 and rely on other AWS moving components to host the container image registry. The entire process was very involved. Not any more!

The excitement doesn’t end there. Companies like Heptio (co-founded by the folks who gave us Kubernetes, Craig McLuckie and Joe Beda) have positioned themselves to enhance the user experience around the Kubernetes technology by producing products and services to simplify and scale the Kubernetes ecosystem. The Heptio Kubernetes Subscriptions (HKS) package offerings help users run Kubernetes in AWS EKS, EC2 or on-premises.

Visit Amazon's EKS product page and Heptio's company website to learn more.

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Petros Koutoupis

Marcel Breaks Time, Converts Documents to Ebooks and More on Cooking with Linux (without a Net)

1 week 5 days ago

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Today on Cooking with Linux (without a Net), I do my best to break time, see what I can do about converting some difficult documents to ebooks, and show off another distribution you've never heard of. Hint: it's named after a lizard. Oh, and there's a super secret secret embedded somewhere in the video. Oooh! Aaah! For the record, this is a prerecorded video of a live show, the Tuesday live Linux Journal show, to be exact, where I do some live Linuxy and open-source stuff, live, on camera, and without the benefit of post video editing, therefore providing a high probability of falling flat on my face.

Cooking with Linux
Marcel Gagné

Streamlio Announces Apache Pulsar 2.0, Red Hat Launches Buildah 1.0, Firefox Experimenting with Two New Projects and More

1 week 5 days ago

News briefs for June 6, 2018.

Streamlio, "the intelligent platform for fast data", today announces the availability of Apache Pulsar 2.0, which is an "open-source distributed pub-sub messaging system originally created at Yahoo and now part of the Apache Software Foundation". This release "adds new capabilities to Apache Pulsar that support easy development and deployment of modern data-driven applications and demonstrate the maturity and enterprise-class capabilities of Pulsar while delivering significantly better performance, scalability and durability than older messaging platforms such as Apache Kafka, as verified in real-world OpenMessaging benchmark tests." For more info, see the Streamlio blog post. Streamlio will be demonstrating the new functionality in Pulsar 2.0 at booth S8 at the upcoming Data Works Summit in San Jose, CA, June 17–21.

Red Hat announced the launch of Buildah 1.0 today. Buildah is a command-line utility that "provides only the basic requirements needed to create or modify Linux container images making it easier to integrate into existing application build pipelines". The container images Buildah builds are "OCI-compliant and can even be built using Dockerfiles. Buildah is a distillation of container development to the bare necessities, designed to help IT teams to limit complexity on critical systems and streamline ownership and security workflows."

Mozilla's Firefox is launching two new projects, Firefox Color and Side View, through its Test Pilot program. According to the TechCrunch article, Firefox Color is basically a theme editor that lets you do things like choose colors in your browser and set textures for the background. Side View lets you "use your widescreen monitor and display two tabs side-by-side inside the browser without having to open a second Firefox window." Both are available here, if you'd like to try them.

Take LinuxGizmos' fourth annual reader survey of open-spec, Linux- or Android-ready single board computers priced less than $200 for a chance to win one of 15 prizes. See LinuxGizmos.com for more info, or go straight to the survey here. Last year, Raspberry Pi 3 was the winner.

Purism has reaffirmed its plan to begin shipping the Librem 5 smartphone in January, Phoronix reports. The Librem 5 will be "the world's first community-owned smartphone ecosystem that gives users complete control over their mobile device".

News Apache Pulsar Big Data Red Hat Containers Mozilla Firefox Embedded Single-Board Computers Purism Mobile
Jill Franklin