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Cooking with Linux (without a Net): Video editing on Linux using Kdenlive and ArcoLinux, too!

2 days 6 hours ago

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It's another Tuesday and another excuse to sip some red while doing some live Linux and open-source experimentation. Yes, it's time for Cooking with Linux (without a Net), and on today's show, I'll show you how to edit a video using the Kdenlive video editor, how to trim said video, adjust audio, fade between clips and apply all sorts of fun effects. Then, I'll show you how to turn that masterpiece into a video format suitable for uploading to YouTube! All of it live, on camera, and without the benefit of post video editing—therefore providing a high probability of falling flat on my face. Once we're done doing art, I'll try out ArcoLinux, another distribution you've probably never heard of, and I'll go through the installation for you. If it wasn't already obvious, this is a pre-recorded video of a live show.

Cooking with Linux Audio/Video Distributions
Marcel Gagné

Can Hackers Crack the Ivory Towers?

2 days 13 hours ago
Academics have been hard at work studying information security. Most fields aren't as replete with hackers as information security, though, and their contributions are felt much more strongly in the private sector than in academia. The differing motives and professional cultures of the two groups act as barriers to direct collaboration, noted CypherCon presenter Anita Nikolich.
Jonathan Terrasi

Red Hat Launches Process Automation Manager 7, Brackets Editor Releases Version 1.13, Qt Announces New Patch Release and More

2 days 13 hours ago

News briefs for June 19, 2018.

Red Hat today launched Red Hat Process Automation Manager 7, which is "a comprehensive, cloud-native platform for developing business automation services and process-centric applications across hybrid cloud environments". This new release expands some key capabilities including cloud native application development, dynamic case management and low-code user experience. You can learn more and get started here.

The free, open-source Brackets editor, which focuses on web development/design, released version 1.13 of its code editor this week. Linux Uprising reports that the new release features "the ability to opening remote files, drag and drop support for the FileTreeFiew, an option to automatically update Brackets, and bug fixes". See also the release notes on GitHub for more info.

Qt announced the release of version 5.11.1 today. This release is the first patch release for the 5.11 series and doesn't include any new functionality, but it does provide more than 150 bug fixes and 700 important changes. See the Change Files page for details.

Today, June 19th, has been declared FreeBSD Day. Visit the website for information on ways you can help them celebrate this 25th anniversary.

Happy Birthday to It's FOSS! Visit the website for giveaways and more details on It's FOSS's 6th birthday celebration.

News Red Hat Cloud Web Development qt FreeBSD
Jill Franklin

Removing All Syscall Invocations from Kernel Space

2 days 14 hours ago
by Zack Brown

There's an effort under way to reduce and ultimately remove all system call invocations from within kernel space. Dominik Brodowski was leading this effort, and he posted some patches to remove a lot of instances from the kernel. Among other things, he said, these patches would make it easier to clean up and optimize the syscall entry points, and also easier to clean up the parts of the kernel that still needed to pretend to be in userspace, just so they could keep using syscalls.

The rationale behind these patches, as expressed by Andy Lutomirski, ultimately was to prevent user code from ever gaining access to kernel memory. Sharing syscalls between kernel space and user space made that impossible at the moment. Andy hoped the patches would go into the kernel quickly, without needing to wait for further cleanup.

Linus Torvalds had absolutely no criticism of these patches, and he indicated that this was a well desired change. He offered to do a little extra housekeeping himself with the kernel release schedule to make Dominik's tasks easier. Linus also agreed with Andy that any cleanup effort could wait—he didn't mind accepting ugly patches to update the syscall calling conventions first, and then accept the cleanup patches later.

Ingo Molnar predicted that with Dominik's changes, the size of the compiled kernel would decrease—always a good thing. But Dominik said no, and in fact he ran some quick numbers for Ingo and found that with his patches, the compiled kernel was actually a few bytes larger. Ingo was surprised but not mortified, saying the slight size increase would not be a showstopper.

This project is similar—although maybe smaller in scope—to the effort to get rid of the big kernel lock (BKL). In the case of the BKL, no one could figure out for years even how to begin to replace it, until finally folks decided to convert all BKL instances into identical local implementations that could be replaced piecemeal with more specialized and less heavyweight locks. After that, it was just a question of slogging through each one until finally even the most finicky instances were replaced with more specialized locking code.

Dominik seems to be using a similar technique now, in which areas of the kernel that still need syscalls can masquerade as user space, while areas of the kernel that are easier to fix get cleaned up first.

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Zack Brown