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OpenSUSE 15 Leap Released, Facebook and Google Already Face GDPR Complaints, GNOME 3.29.2 and More

3 weeks 6 days ago

News briefs for May 25, 2018.

OpenSUSE 15 Leap, the "project's latest non-rolling-release, enterprise-geared distribution", was released today. This new version "brings a new partitioner, makes use of Firewalld for its firewall, a new look, various new enterprise features, support for NextCloud, atomic updates support via Kubic, and much more. The GNOME version of openSUSE Leap 15 is also using Wayland by default while their KDE Plasma 5.12 LTS desktop continues using an X.org session default." For more details on all the new features, visit the OpenSUSE News site.

Facebook and Google are already facing GDPR complaints due to "forced consent". TechCrunch reports that Max Schrems has filed complaints against Facebook, Instagram, WhatsApp and Android. Regarding Facebook, Schrems commented "In the end users only had the choice to delete the account or hit the 'agree'-button—that's not a free choice, it more reminds of a North Korean election process."

If you have a NETGEAR router, see the security advisory for steps you can take to protect yourself against the VPNFilter malware.

GNOME 3.29.2 was released yesterday. This is the second unstable release in the 3.30 cycle and is primarily for testing and hacking.

GamingOnLinux reports that Paradox has confirmed its new game Imperator: Rome! will be supported for Linux.

News Distributions openSUSE Facebook Google GDPR GNOME gaming
Jill Franklin

FOSS as a Part of a Corporate Sustainability Plan

3 weeks 6 days ago
by VM Brasseur

Free and open-source software is a critical part of your company's supply chain. Here's why and how you can include it in your corporate sustainability plan.

In 1983 the United Nations convened a commission of 22 people to investigate the question of the worldwide environmental and social impact of human development. Four years later, in 1987, the commission released Our Common Future, more commonly known as the Brundtland Report in honour of Gro Harlem Brundtland, chairperson of the commission. This report detailed the very real socio-environmental issues facing humanity. One of its recommendations was for governments, organizations and companies to start engaging in what it called sustainable development. That is, "...development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs".

Since then there's been steep growth in the number of corporations that maintain and operate according to a corporate sustainability plan. These plans encompass environmental as well as social aspects of doing business. They encompass actions within an organization—such as natural resource usage, diversity and inclusion, and fair treatment of employees—as well as those external to the organization—such as the sustainability operations of their entire supply chain as well as the overall impact the corporation has on the Earth and its inhabitants.

The Benefits of Sustainability

A sustainability plan impacts every facet of an organization's operations and can take a fair bit of effort to implement and maintain. If that's the case, why are more corporations putting these plans into action every year? While it would be nice to think that this occurs for entirely altruistic reasons—taking care of the Earth and its inhabitants is simply the right thing to do, after all—the fact of the matter is that studies repeatedly show that properly implemented corporate sustainability plans are very good for the bottom line.

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VM Brasseur

WhiteSource Rolls Out New Open Source Security Detector

4 weeks ago
WhiteSource has launched its next-generation software composition analysis technology, dubbed "Effective Usage Analysis," with the promise that it can reduce open source vulnerability alerts by 70 percent. The newly developed technology provides details beyond which components are present in the application. It provides actionable insights into how components are being used.
Jack M. Germain

RIP Robin "Roblimo" Miller

4 weeks ago
by Carlie Fairchild

Linux Journal has learned fellow journalist and long-time voice of the Linux community Robin "Roblimo" Miller has passed away. Miller was perhaps best known by the community for his role as Editor in Chief of Open Source Technology Group, the company that owned Slashdot, SourceForge.net, freshmeat, Linux.com, NewsForge, and ThinkGeek from 2000 to 2008. He went on to write and do video interviews for FOSS Force, penned articles for several publications, and authored three books, The Online Rules of Successful Companies, Point & Click Linux!, and Point & Click OpenOffice.org, all published by Prentice Hall.

As Marcel Gagne so perfectly summarized, "Robin was one of those people who could make you laugh while teaching you a thing or two."

Roblimo, you will be missed. 

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Carlie Fairchild